About The Event

IKF World Korfball Championship

The Durban event will be the 11th edition of the IKF WKC.

Continental Championships events were held in Africa, Americas, Asia Oceania and Europe over the period March to October 2018.  Forty Countries participated in the four Continental Championships respectively. Out of these Continental Championships twenty Countries qualified for participation at the IKF WKC 2019, making it the first ever Championships with twenty participating Countries.  In previous editions participation was limited to sixteen Countries.

Korfball

International and Local Governing Bodies

The International Korfball Federation (IKF) was founded in Antwerp (Belgium) on the 11 June 1933 as a continuation of the International Korfball Bureau established in 1924 by the Dutch and Belgian Associations.

The IKF was officially recognized by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in 1993 and is affiliated to the Association of the IOC Recognized International Sports Federations (ARISF), the International World Games Association (IWGA) and Sportaccord (Sportaccord).

The IKF aims to spread korfball around the globe. It provides sixty-eight (68) (as per 20 August 2017) affiliated member countries with financial, material, and structural support to achieve this goal. Kenya (68) and Suriname (69) are the most recent new (associated) members after the decisions of the General Meeting 20 August 2017 in The Hague (NED).

The IKF has established a network of contacts in many countries and actively promotes the game by transferring knowledge internationally by exchange programmes and inviting selected korfball players, coaches, and administrators to its training courses in order to create a stable local structure in all 68 affiliated countries – see under IKF Members – on which a flourishing korfball organisation can be built. Key point in the IKF Strategy is youth development in all member countries.

The South African Korfball Federation (SAKF) was established on the 11th of March 1993.

The SAKF is affiliated to and recognized by the following Macro Sport Bodies:

  • IKF
  • Sport and Recreation South Africa (SRSA)
  • South African Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC)
  • IKF Africa Continental Korfball Federation (IKF Africa)
  • Africa Union Sport Council Region 5 Korfball Confederation (AURSC 5 KC)

Korfball in South Africa is structured on a Club system spread over six of the nine Provinces in South Africa.

Participating

Teams

Teams

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Three countries, namely Brazil, Slovakia and Macau China, are official reserves for the Championships after the different qualification events. In the event of a Country declining participation the IKF will ensure a reserve Country’s participation.

The Sport

Korfball

Korfball, as a sport, is like a mix of handball, netball and basketball. Two teams of 8, each team having 4 male and 4 female members, who are in turn divided equally into 2 zones – attacking and defending. Before you let your imagination run wild – it is a limited contact sport.

As an additional leveller, men can only defend against men and women against women. But as a team, they work together. And they have to! Once a player has the ball, she/he has to have one foot planted down – no dribbling, no running and no walking. This means her/his teammates have to move tactically, and continuously, to provide passing options. Now you’re thinking – what about the tall kids who will dominate the show? Not so easy – one can only attempt to score if there is no defender between that person and the basket (or korf).

So, you have to be smart, quick and sneaky, and escape your defender before you can even attempt to score. It gets better – after every 2 goals scored, attackers become defenders and vice versa. Simply genius!

Think about it – a sport that is perfectly gender-mixed has limited contact, requires impeccable teamwork, constant movement and forces each player to be equally adept at attacking and defending. As activities go, it ticks a lot of boxes. It does not require massive infrastructure either. A safe playing surface, a korf at each end and a zones demarcation are all that is needed. If you struggle to acquire korfs, use anything that lets a ball pass through!

Play indoors in bad weather, adjust court and team size to available space, make it happen. In fact, there are already versions of the game with fewer players (4 players, 1 korf) and different surfaces (beach, ice, water) being used for development of the sport in many countries. Just one unbreakable rule – the teams have to be completely gender-mixed.